Community Safety


In 2020, San Antonio is the safest big city in America.

Public safety officials, city staff and citizens collaborate through strong, engaged community neighborhood networks to reduce crime and promote a thriving and law-abiding San Antonio. The city’s proactive prevention programs, responsive enforcement efforts and high state of disaster readiness result in low levels of crime and a high sense of personal safety.

Overview

Creating a vision of a safe community involves many players and strategies: systems in place that are trusted and responsive; citizen involvement and awareness; and resources available to help keep neighborhoods and households safe. These are all components that we can identify, which makes them easier to improve upon. 

Increase Attendance at Community Safety Trainings

Met and Exceeded Met & Exceeded

Safe communities require people to be engaged in improving the health and well-being of their own neighborhoods. One measure of this involvement is the extent to which community members are participating in citywide opportunities to gain new skills and knowledge that will help them keep their community safe. In 2014, we exceeded our 2020 goal for increasing attendance at community trainings. As these trainings continue, it may be useful to explore the benefits that participants gained from these trainings and the degree to which they increased community safety. 

Call to Action: 

  • Learn more about SA2020 community safety partners, then give your time, talent, energy, or dollars to one (or more).
  • To learn more about simple steps you can take, read some great advice from the National Crime Prevention Council.
  • Here are some crime prevention tips from our very own SAPD, as well as some of their citizen participation programs.
  • Connect with your City Councilmember if you have questions or concerns.
  • Create neighborhood and community environments where people know and respect each other.
  • Join a neighborhood watch program, such as Cellular On Patrol.
  • Join or form neighborhood associations and build coalitions with local law enforcement to communicate the safety concerns of your neighborhood. 

 

Updated December 2016

 
Graph Type:
 
 
Year Value Distribution

Share